German

German Curriculum

Requirements for German Major and Minor

Web Links and Study Aids

The German Club

German Curriculum

111-112. Beginning German I and II (4 hours)

  • This course sequence is designed to help students cultivate a basic level of proficiency in all four language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening). By the end of this sequence, students should be able to communicate meaningfully with native-speakers who are accustomed to dealing with non-native users of German. Emphasis is on basic needs in highly predictable, common everyday situations.  (4 hrs. credit each)

251-252. Intermediate German I and II (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 102 or exemption.
    This sequence is designed to help students enhance their proficiency in all four language skills. By the end of the sequence, students should be able to communicate meaningfully with sympathetic native speakers. Emphasis is on an increasing variety of interactive transactions in past, present, future, and hypothetical frames of reference, including those requiring expression of opinion, emotions, wishes, and reservations. 

253S.-353S. German Studies Abroad (Variable credit up to 15 hours)

  • Prerequisite: Completion of German 112 or consent of instructor.
    Emphasis on one or more of the following areas: German languages, culture, history, and literature. Variable credit up to 15 hours, up to 9 of which may count toward the major or minor.

285. Intermediate Oral Practice (1 hour)

  • Prerequisite: German 251 or consent of instructor.
    This course is designed for students who would like to maintain their proficiency in speaking and listening skills. Course content will include discussion of current topics from German-language newspapers, magazines, newsletters, videos, and films. One credit-hour per semester not to exceed four credit-hours; does not count toward major or minor; non-optional and "Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory'' grading.

311. Conversation and Composition (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 252 or consent of instructor.
    Continued enhancement and refinement of the four language skills leading to the ability to perform effectively and meaningfully in an increased variety of social situations. Introduction to discourse strategies in speaking (e.g. interrupting speaker, asserting one's opinion, paraphrasing) and in writing (e.g. requesting information, applying for positions, refusing or accepting invitations).

321. Contemporary German Society and Culture (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 311 or consent of instructor.
    On-going enhancement and refinement of skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Class discussion will focus on a variety of issues affecting contemporary German society and culture (e.g., political, economic, sociological, psychological, religious).

351. German Literature, Culture, and Society I (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 311.
    On-going enhancement and refinement of skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Class discussion will focus on excerpts from works written by authors such as Walther von der Vogelweide, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Martin Luther, Andreas Gryphius, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, Johann Michael Lenz, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Friedrich von Schiller, Friedrich Hoelderlin, and Immanuel Kant.

352. German Literature, Culture, and Society II (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 311.
    On-going enhancement and refinement of skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Class discussion will focus on excerpts from works written by authors such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Friedrich von Schiller, Novalis, Joseph von Eichendorff, Heinrich Heine, Arthur Schopenhauer, Friedrich Nietzsche, Theodor Fontane, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Bertolt Brecht. 

353. German Literature, Culture, and Society III (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 311.
    On-going enhancement and refinement of skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Class discussion will focus on works written by authors such as Bertolt Brecht, Friedrich Duerrenmatt, Heinrich Boell, Guenter Grass, Wolf Biermann, Christa Wolf, and Heiner Mueller. Special emphasis on issues attending post-unification Germany and the perennial German Question. Special emphasis on issues attending post-unification Germany. 

385. Special Topics in German (Subtitle) (1-3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    May be repeated for major or minor credit.

411. Advanced Stylistics (2 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 311 and two courses in German literature, culture, and society.
    This course is designed to help students refine their abilities in all four skills and discuss with greater sophistication a wide variety of complex topics pertaining to contemporary German. 

425. Seminar (3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: GER 311, one course from literature, society, and culture grouping, and consent of the instructor.
    This course is designed to help students examine in depth a particular author, work, or issue in German literature, culture, or society.

480. Internship (variable credit up to 15 hours)

  • Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
    A supervised program of field experience in which students make practical application of their skills in German in an approved establishment outside the University. The department as a whole must approve the student's project, which will be directed by an instructor and an on-site supervisor. No more than 3 hours may be counted toward a German major or minor.

485. Assistantship for German 111-112 (1 hour)

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
    Selected German majors or minors serve as assistants in GER 111 or 112. Assistants attend 2-3 classes per week, study the assigned work, and help conduct classroom and lab activities. Assistants may review but will not evaluate students' work. Other duties will determined by the instructor in consultation with the assistant. In addition, the assistant will be required to complete a written reflection on the experience. Does not count toward the major or minor. Mandatory S/U grading. May not be repeated.

490. Supervised Independent Study (1-3 hours)

  • Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    This course is designed to help students examine in depth a particular author, work, or issue in German literature, culture, or society. May be repeated for major or minor credit.

Requirements for German Major and Minor

A major in German consists of 28 hours*, with a minimum of 14 hours in courses numbered 300 or above. German majors must complete the Zertifikat Deutsch examination with a passing grade (minimum of "ausreichend bestanden'').

A minor in German consists of a minimum of 18 hours*, to include GER 311 and two other 300-level courses.

* In all FLL majors and minors, lower-division requirements may be exempted as a result of examination or evidence of prior training or experience.  

Why are German Majors requried to take the Zertifikat Deutsch Exam? 

The small size of the German program at Mercer University has the distinct advantage of allowing you to work more closely with a professor than might be the case at larger institutions. However, this intimate environment has the disadvantage of having your proficiency in German assessed by only one or two faculty members.

The Zertifikat Deutsch als Fremdsprache examination, which is administered every Spring by the Goethe Institut in Atlanta, Georgia, is an internationally recognized certification that assesses objectively your degree of proficiency in the German language (i.e. reading, writing, listening, speaking). The Zertifikat Deutsch is also the preferred language examination for people wishing to acquire German citizenship. This certificate, combined with your record of German study at Mercer University, will help distinguish you as a candidate for employment in a wide variety of professions.

For samples of the Zertifikat Deutsch exam, click here. Additional ZDF self-tests are available on the WebCT server. Ask Dr Weintraut for instructions on how to access these exercises.

Web Links and Study Aids

The German Club

Der Deutsch-Club, Mercer's German club, is designed to help students gain a better appreciation for German language, society and culture.