Latin

Latin Curriculum

Requirements for Latin major and minor

Web links and study aids

The Latin Club

Latin curriculum

LAT 111, 112, and 251 or consent of instructor are prerequisites for all 300-level courses.

111-112. Beginning Latin I and II    (3 hours)  
Open to students with little or no previous instruction in Latin, this sequence enables participants to attain a fundamental competency in Latin grammar and to build a basic Latin vocabulary. Close readings of basic texts, including translations from Latin to English and vice versa will be stressed. In addition to offering an introduction to Roman civilization and literature, this sequence will familiarize students with Latin elements in the English language and with the sound of Latin.

251. Intermediate Latin    (3 hours)  
Prerequisite: Successful completion of or exemption from LAT 111-112.
This course is designed to further students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary. By making the transition from textbook selections to brief excerpts from a variety of Golden Age authors (e.g., Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Vergil, Livy, and Ovid), students will practice translating and interpreting original literary texts.  

253S/353S. Latin Studies Abroad    (Variable credit up to 15 hours)
Prerequisite: Completion of  LAT 112 or consent of department faculty. 
Study abroad with emphasis on one or more of the following areas: the Latin language, Roman literature, classical history, and classical culture.  Variable credit up to 15 hours, up to 9 of which may count toward the major or minor. 

300. Republican Prose    (3 hours)  
An overview of the development of prose in the Republican era, with emphasis on the works of Cicero, Caesar, and Sallust. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed.

310. Imperial Prose    (3 hours)  
An overview of the development of prose in the Imperial era, with emphasis on the works of Livy, Tacitus, Seneca, Pliny the Younger, and Petronius. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed. 

320. Comedy    (3 hours)  
Besides providing an overview of the development of the Roman comedy, this course offers students close reading of selected comedies by Plautus and Terence, two early Roman writers endowed with timeless wit. In some instances comparisons will be made with adaptations by modern authors. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed. 

330. Philosophical Texts    (3 hours)  
A comparison of the two leading philosophical schools in ancient Rome: Stoicism and Epicureanism. Authors to be studied include Cicero, Seneca, and Lucretius. While the former two emphasize virtue and duty in an individual's dealing with fellow human beings and the gods, the latter attempts to free the Romans' minds from superstition. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed.

340. Vergil    (3 hours)  
While introducing students to Vergil's smaller works, i.e., the Eclogues and the Georgics, this course focuses on the author's greatest work, the Aeneid, the Roman national epic. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed. 

350. Ovid    (3 hours)  
While offering an overview of all of Ovid's works, the course will focus on the Metamorphoses. Reading and interpreting these legends of transformations will familiarize students with important topics from Greek and Roman mythology. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed. 

360. Lyric Poetry    (3 hours)  
An overview of the development of Roman lyric poetry. Selected authors for close readings include Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, and Propertius. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed. 

370. Satire    (3 hours)  
A survey of the development of Roman satire, with readings from Horace, Persius, Juvenal, and Martial. In addition to literary, cultural, and historical material, the further development of students' competency in Latin grammar and vocabulary will be stressed.

485.  Assistantship for Latin 111/112    (1 hour)  
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Selected Latin majors or minors serve as assistants  in LAT 111 or 112.  Assistants attend 2-3 classes per week, study the assigned work, and help conduct classroom and lab activities.  Assistants may review but will not evaluate students' work.  Other duties will be determined by the instructor in consultation with the assistant.  In addition, the assistant will be required to complete a written reflection on the experience.  Does not count toward the major or minor.  Mandatory S/U grading.  May not be repeated. 

490. Supervised Independent Study    (1-3 hours)  
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
An in-depth study of a particular author, work, or issue in Roman literature or culture. May be repeated for major or minor credit.

Requirements for Latin major and minor

A major in Latin consists of at least 24 hours*, 15 of which must be in courses numbered 300 or above. Majors are encouraged to take courses in related areas, such as ancient history and classical literature. A minor in Latin consists of 18 hours*, 9 of which must be in courses numbered 300 or above.  Latin majors must pass an exit examination.

*IN ALL FLL MAJORS AND MINORS, SOME LOWER-DIVISION REQUIREMENTS MAY BE EXEMPTED AS A RESULT OF EXAMINATION OR EVIDENCE OF PRIOR TRAINING OR EXPERIENCE.

Web links and study aids

Latin Club

The Latin Club of Mercer University promotes awareness of the classics and Roman culture through social, recreational, cultural, and educational programs and services.  For further information, please the Advisor, Dr. Achim Kopp